Why smart statistics are the key to fighting crime

When she became the attorney general of New Jersey in 2007, Anne Milgram quickly discovered a few startling facts: not only did her team not really know who they were putting in jail, but they had no way of understanding if their decisions were actually making the public safer. And so began her ongoing, inspirational quest to bring data analytics and statistical analysis to the US criminal justice system.

 

At Balcostics our mission is to empower leaders with the required data and information to make better decisions. Learn more about our full list of research outsourcing services for individuals and companies: Click here

 

How to fix Jamaica’s justice system in less than 5 years

On February 26 we published an article titled, “The ‘Data Problem’ hampering Jamaica’s Court System“. Today, Donovan Ferguson examines possible solutions – over to Donovan:

I am of the view that now is the best possible time to correct this problem; here are my reasons for saying this:

1. Jamaica now has an advance telecommunication system. (3 Tier data centers, Fiber optic networks, 4G WIFI solutions).

2. Jamaica has numerous well trained, yet unemployed professionals, plus we have approximately six universities and other colleges that can aid with training.

3. A large diaspora estimated to be two million between North America and Europe, which would be more than willing and able to contribute financially if a comprehensive plan and implementation roadmap was developed.

Engage with Caribbean Diaspora

For example, the Government could create a program that all or part of its diaspora could contribute to a crime fighting and justice modernization fund and intern, contributors would receive a special 5% discount on the transaction fees and taxes of any future property purchases in Jamaica.  If 1 million contributors, donated $15 USD per month  = $15 million USD per month; or If 2 million contributors, donated $15 USD per month  = $30 million USD per month, in five years, Jamaica could easily have the most comprehensive and efficient justice and crime prevention system if we’re able to tap into the resources of our diaspora.This initiative will provide a two-fold benefit.

Barriers to Caribbean diaspora engagement1. Monies raised from donations can be used to develop state of the art crime lab, modern police stations with the necessary equipment and competent professional personnel, an all Island video surveillance system, modern efficient Court facilities, and finally a first world witness protection system.

2. There are many philanthropic individuals and organizations that would be willing to partner with Jamaica in its quest to create a comprehensive and efficient justice and crime prevention system.

3. Install solar electric system and energy efficient LED in courts, police stations and Ministry of Justice facilities as a measure for reducing operating cost. 

4. Employ retired Scotland Yard, Canadian mounted police and Australian police officers to help train and mentor new Jamaican Police Officers.

5. Hire only College graduates with a bachelors degree or higher to work for the Ministry of justice and the police force.

6. Review and modernize all existing laws. 

Contributed by: Donovan Ferguson.  BSTM, ACMT

Mr. Ferguson is a Jamaican who lives in the USA. He attends the  Western Governor’s University pursuing a MBA- IT management and working as a lead Apple Tech at Microelectronics.

At Balcostics our mission is to empower leaders with the required data and information to make better decisions. Learn more about our full list of research outsourcing services for individuals and companies: Click here

How Crime affect Investment in Jamaica: Study

Assessing the Problem:

  • Puerto Rico, the Caribbean – Jamaica in particular – and other developing countries, since the 1980’s, have placed great emphasis on a ‘FDI’ lead development strategy. This strategy is expected to increase capital formation and bolster production efficiencies through the transfer of new technologies and investment capital.
  • The prevalence of Violent Crimes has been shown to have a negative impact on the productive capacity of many countries, exerting high levels of uncertainties, low expected returns and increased production costs among many other disincentives. Being cognizant of the implications of Violent Crimes on a country’s productive capacity, it can be deduced that incidents of Violent Crime can deter and dissuade investors from selecting Jamaica as an investment hub.

Purpose of this Study:

    • To examine the effect of Violent Crime on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Jamaica through the use of a Violent Crime Index and Individual Crime Variables.

Analyzing the Data:

  • The Violent Crime Index is an average of the following crime variables: Murder, Rape and Carnal Abuse, Shooting with Intent and Robbery.
  • Data was retrieved from the Ministry of National Security 1970-2001.

Main findings of this study: Read more of this post